下载
加入VIP
  • 专属下载特权
  • 现金文档折扣购买
  • VIP免费专区
  • 千万文档免费下载

上传资料

关闭

关闭

关闭

封号提示

内容

首页 kasparov-book-review

kasparov-book-review.pdf

kasparov-book-review

stoneage
2013-11-17 0人阅读 举报 0 0 暂无简介

简介:本文档为《kasparov-book-reviewpdf》,可适用于其他资料领域

TheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueFebruary ,  IssueTheChessMasterandtheComputerGarry Kasparov�Chess Metaphors: Artificial Intelligence and the Human Mindby Diego Rasskin­Gutman, translated from the Spanish by Deborah KloskyMIT Press,  pp, $Font Size: A A ATheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueSteve HondaAFPGetty ImagesGarry Kasparov during his rematch against the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue, In , in Hamburg, I played against thirty­two different chess computers at the same timein what is known as a simultaneous exhibition I walked from one machine to the next, makingmy moves over a period of more than five hours The four leading chess computermanufacturers had sent their top models, including eight named after me from theTheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueelectronics firm SaitekIt illustrates the state of computer chess at the time that it didn’t come as much of a surprisewhen I achieved a perfect – score, winning every game, although there was anuncomfortable moment At one point I realized that I was drifting into trouble in a gameagainst one of the “Kasparov” brand models If this machine scored a win or even a draw,people would be quick to say that I had thrown the game to get PR for the company, so I hadto intensify my efforts Eventually I found a way to trick the machine with a sacrifice itshould have refused From the human perspective, or at least from my perspective, thosewere the good old days of man vs machine chessEleven years later I narrowly defeated the supercomputer Deep Blue in a match Then, in, IBM redoubled its effortsand doubled Deep Blue’s processing powerand I lost therematch in an event that made headlines around the world The result was met withastonishment and grief by those who took it as a symbol of mankind’s submission before thealmighty computer (“The Brain’s Last Stand” read the Newsweek headline) Others shruggedtheir shoulders, surprised that humans could still compete at all against the enormouscalculating power that, by , sat on just about every desk in the first worldIt was the specialiststhe chess players and the programmers and the artificial intelligenceenthusiastswho had a more nuanced appreciation of the result Grandmasters had alreadybegun to see the implications of the existence of machines that could playif only, at thispoint, in a select few types of board configurationswith godlike perfection The computerchess people were delighted with the conquest of one of the earliest and holiest grails ofcomputer science, in many cases matching the mainstream media’s hyperbole The book Deep Blue by Monty Newborn was blurbed as follows: “a rare, pivotal watershedbeyond all other triumphs: Orville Wright’s first flight, NASA’s landing on the moon…”The AI crowd, too, was pleased with the result and the attention, but dismayed by the fact thatDeep Blue was hardly what their predecessors had imagined decades earlier when theydreamed of creating a machine to defeat the world chess champion Instead of a computerthat thought and played chess like a human, with human creativity and intuition, they got onethat played like a machine, systematically evaluating  million possible moves on thechess board per second and winning with brute number­crunching force As Igor Aleksander,a British AI and neural networks pioneer, explained in his  book, How to Build a Mind:By the mid­s the number of people with some experience of using computerswas many orders of magnitude greater than in the s In the Kasparov defeatTheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueMthey recognized that here was a great triumph for programmers, but not one thatmay compete with the human intelligence that helps us to lead our livesIt was an impressive achievement, of course, and a human achievement by the members ofthe IBM team, but Deep Blue was only intelligent the way your programmable alarm clock isintelligent Not that losing to a $ million alarm clock made me feel any bettery hopes for a return match with Deep Blue were dashed, unfortunately IBM had thepublicity it wanted and quickly shut down the project Other chess computing projectsaround the world also lost their sponsorship Though I would have liked my chances in arematch in  if I were better prepared, it was clear then that computer superiority overhumans in chess had always been just a matter of time Today, for $ you can buy a homePC program that will crush most grandmasters In , I played serious matches against twoof these programs running on commercially available multiprocessor serversand, ofcourse, I was playing just one game at a timeand in both cases the score ended in a tie witha win apiece and several drawsInevitable or not, no one understood all the ramifications of having a super­grandmaster onyour laptop, especially what this would mean for professional chess There were manydoomsday scenarios about people losing interest in chess with the rise of the machines,especially after my loss to Deep Blue Some replied to this with variations on the theme ofhow we still hold footraces despite cars and bicycles going much faster, a spurious analogysince cars do not help humans run faster while chess computers undoubtedly have an effecton the quality of human chessAnother group postulated that the game would be solved, ie, a mathematically conclusiveway for a computer to win from the start would be found (Or perhaps it would prove that agame of chess played in the best possible way always ends in a draw) Perhaps a real versionof HAL  would simply announce move e, with checkmate in, say, , movesThese gloomy predictions have not come true, nor will they ever come to pass Chess is fartoo complex to be definitively solved with any technology we can conceive of todayHowever, our looked­down­upon cousin, checkers, or draughts, suffered this fate quiterecently thanks to the work of Jonathan Schaeffer at the University of Alberta and hisunbeatable program ChinookThe number of legal chess positions is , the number of different possible games, Authors have attempted various ways to convey this immensity, usually based on one of thefew fields to regularly employ such exponents, astronomy In his book Chess Metaphors,TheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueTDiego Rasskin­Gutman points out that a player looking eight moves ahead is alreadypresented with as many possible games as there are stars in the galaxy Another staple, avariation of which is also used by Rasskin­Gutman, is to say there are more possible chessgames than the number of atoms in the universe All of these comparisons impress upon thecasual observer why brute­force computer calculation can’t solve this ancient board gameThey are also handy, and I am not above doing this myself, for impressing people with howcomplicated chess is, if only in a largely irrelevant mathematical wayThis astronomical scale is not at all irrelevant to chess programmers They’ve known fromthe beginning that solving the gamecreating a provably unbeatable programwas notpossible with the computer power available, and that effective shortcuts would have to befound In fact, the first chess program put into practice was designed by legendary Britishmathematician Alan Turing in , and he didn’t even have a computer! He processed thealgorithm on pieces of paper and this “paper machine” played a competent gameRasskin­Gutman covers this well­traveled territory in a book that achieves its goal of beingan overview of overviews, if little else The history of the study of brain function is coveredin the first chapter, tempting the reader to skip ahead You might recall axons and dendritesfrom high school biology class We also learn about cholinergic and aminergic systems andmany other things that are not found by my computer’s artificially intelligent English spell­checking systemor referenced again by the author Then it’s on to similarly concise, ifinconclusive, surveys of artificial intelligence, chess computers, and how humans play chesshere have been many unintended consequences, both positive and negative, of the rapidproliferation of powerful chess software Kids love computers and take to themnaturally, so it’s no surprise that the same is true of the combination of chess and computersWith the introduction of super­powerful software it became possible for a youngster to havea top­ level opponent at home instead of needing a professional trainer from an early ageCountries with little by way of chess tradition and few available coaches can now produceprodigies I am in fact coaching one of them this year, nineteen­year­old Magnus Carlsen,from Norway, where relatively little chess is playedThe heavy use of computer analysis has pushed the game itself in new directions Themachine doesn’t care about style or patterns or hundreds of years of established theory Itcounts up the values of the chess pieces, analyzes a few billion moves, and counts them upagain (A computer translates each piece and each positional factor into a value in order toreduce the game to numbers it can crunch) It is entirely free of prejudice and doctrine andTheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueEthis has contributed to the development of players who are almost as free of dogma as themachines with which they train Increasingly, a move isn’t good or bad because it looks thatway or because it hasn’t been done that way before It’s simply good if it works and bad if itdoesn’t Although we still require a strong measure of intuition and logic to play well,humans today are starting to play more like computersThe availability of millions of games at one’s fingertips in a database is also making thegame’s best players younger and younger Absorbing the thousands of essential patterns andopening moves used to take many years, a process indicative of Malcolm Gladwell’s “,hours to become an expert” theory as expounded in his recent book Outliers (Gladwell’searlier book, Blink, rehashed, if more creatively, much of the cognitive psychology materialthat is re­rehashed in Chess Metaphors) Today’s teens, and increasingly pre­teens, canaccelerate this process by plugging into a digitized archive of chess information and makingfull use of the superiority of the young mind to retain it all In the pre­computer era, teenagegrandmasters were rarities and almost always destined to play for the world championshipBobby Fischer’s  record of attaining the grandmaster title at fifteen was broken only in It has been broken twenty times since then, with the current record holder, UkrainianSergey Karjakin, having claimed the highest title at the nearly absurd age of twelve in Now twenty, Karjakin is among the world’s best, but like most of his modern wunderkindpeers he’s no Fischer, who stood out head and shoulders above his peersand soon enoughabove the rest of the chess world as wellxcelling at chess has long been considered a symbol of more general intelligence That isan incorrect assumption in my view, as pleasant as it might be But for the purposes ofargument and investigation, chess is, in Russkin­Gutman’s words, “an unparalleled laboratory,since both the learning process and the degree of ability obtained can be objectified andquantified, providing an excellent comparative framework on which to use rigorous analyticaltechniques”Here I agree wholeheartedly, if for different reasons I am much more interested in using thechess laboratory to illuminate the workings of the human mind, not the artificial mind As Iput it in my  book, How Life Imitates Chess, “Chess is a unique cognitive nexus, a placewhere art and science come together in the human mind and are then refined and improved byexperience” Coincidentally the section in which that phrase appears is titled “More than ametaphor” It makes the case for using the decision­making process of chess as a model forunderstanding and improving our decision­making everywhere elseTheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueThis is not to say that I am not interested in the quest for intelligent machines My manyexhibitions with chess computers stemmed from a desire to participate in this grandexperiment It was my luck (perhaps my bad luck) to be the world chess champion during thecritical years in which computers challenged, then surpassed, human chess players Before and after  these duels held little interest The computers quickly went from tooweak to too strong But for a span of ten years these contests were fascinating clashesbetween the computational power of the machines (and, lest we forget, the human wisdom oftheir programmers) and the intuition and knowledge of the grandmasterIn what Rasskin­Gutman explains as Moravec’s Paradox, in chess, as in so many things, whatcomputers are good at is where humans are weak, and vice versa This gave me an idea for anexperiment What if instead of human versus machine we played as partners My brainchildsaw the light of day in a match in  in León, Spain, and we called it “Advanced Chess”Each player had a PC at hand running the chess software of his choice during the game Theidea was to create the highest level of chess ever played, a synthesis of the best of man andmachineAlthough I had prepared for the unusual format, my match against the Bulgarian VeselinTopalov, until recently the world’s number one ranked player, was full of strange sensationsHaving a computer program available during play was as disturbing as it was exciting Andbeing able to access a database of a few million games meant that we didn’t have to strain ourmemories nearly as much in the opening, whose possibilities have been thoroughlycatalogued over the years But since we both had equal access to the same database, theadvantage still came down to creating a new idea at some pointHaving a computer partner also meant never having to worry about making a tactical blunderThe computer could project the consequences of each move we considered, pointing outpossible outcomes and countermoves we might otherwise have missed With that taken careof for us, we could concentrate on strategic planning instead of spending so much time oncalculations Human creativity was even more paramount under these conditions Despiteaccess to the “best of both worlds,” my games with Topalov were far from perfect We wereplaying on the clock and had little time to consult with our silicon assistants Still, the resultswere notable A month earlier I had defeated the Bulgarian in a match of “regular” rapid chess– Our advanced chess match ended in a – draw My advantage in calculating tactics hadbeen ified by the machineThis experiment goes unmentioned by Russkin­Gutman, a major omission since it relates soTheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueTclosely to his subject Even more notable was how the advanced chess experiment continuedIn , the online chess­playing site Playchesscom hosted what it called a “freestyle”chess tournament in which anyone could compete in teams with other players or computersNormally, “anti­cheating” algorithms are employed by online sites to prevent, or at leastdiscourage, players from cheating with computer assistance (I wonder if these detectionalgorithms, which employ diagnostic analysis of moves and calculate probabilities, are anyless “intelligent” than the playing programs they detect)Lured by the substantial prize money, several groups of strong grandmasters working withseveral computers at the same time entered the competition At first, the results seemedpredictable The teams of human plus machine dominated even the strongest computers Thechess machine Hydra, which is a chess­specific supercomputer like Deep Blue, was no matchfor a strong human player using a relatively weak laptop Human strategic guidance combinedwith the tactical acuity of a computer was overwhelmingThe surprise came at the conclusion of the event The winner was revealed to be not agrandmaster with a state­of­the­art PC but a pair of amateur American chess players usingthree computers at the same time Their skill at manipulating and “coaching” their computersto look very deeply into positions effectively counteracted the superior chess understandingof their grandmaster opponents and the greater computational power of other participantsWeak human  machine  better process was superior to a strong computer alone and, moreremarkably, superior to a strong human  machine  inferior processhe “freestyle” result, though startling, fits with my belief that talent is a misused termand a misunderstood concept The moment I became the youngest world chess championin history at the age of twenty­two in , I began receiving endless questions about thesecret of my success and the nature of my talent Instead of asking about Sicilian Defenses,journalists wanted to know about my diet, my personal life, how many moves ahead I saw, andhow many games I held in my memoryI soon realized that my answers were disappointing I didn’t eat anything special I workedhard because my mother had taught me to My memory was good, but hardly photographic Asfor how many moves ahead a grandmaster sees, Russkin­Gutman makes much of the answerattributed to the great Cuban world champion José Raúl Capablanca, among others: “Just one,the best one” This answer is as good or bad as any other, a pithy way of disposing with anattempt by an outsider to ask something insightful and failing to do so It’s the equivalent ofasking Lance Armstrong how many times he shifts gears during the Tour de FranceTheChessMasterandtheComputerbyGarryKasparov|TheNewYorkReviewofBookswwwnybookscomarticlesarchivesfebthechessmasterandthecomputerpagination=falseprintpage=trueWThe only real answer, “It depends on the position and how much time I have,” is unsatisfyingIn what may have been my best tournament game at the  Hoogovens tournament in theNetherlands, I visualized the winning position a full fifteen moves aheadan unusual feat Isacrificed a great deal of material for an attack, burning my bridges; if my calculations werefaulty I would be dead lost Although my intuition

用户评价(0)

关闭

新课改视野下建构高中语文教学实验成果报告(32KB)

抱歉,积分不足下载失败,请稍后再试!

提示

试读已结束,如需要继续阅读或者下载,敬请购买!

文档小程序码

使用微信“扫一扫”扫码寻找文档

1

打开微信

2

扫描小程序码

3

发布寻找信息

4

等待寻找结果

我知道了
评分:

/10

kasparov-book-review

VIP

在线
客服

免费
邮箱

爱问共享资料服务号

扫描关注领取更多福利