首页 > > > Totally Integrated Enterprises 1.pdf

Totally Integrated Enterprises 1.pdf

Totally Integrated Enterprises …

上传者: gushici 2012-02-25 评分1 评论0 下载15 收藏10 阅读量821 暂无简介 简介 举报

简介:本文档为《Totally Integrated Enterprises 1pdf》,可适用于战略管理领域,主题内容包含TOTALLYINTEGRATEDENTERPRISESAFrameworkandMethodologyforBusinessandTechnolo符等。

TOTALLY INTEGRATED ENTERPRISES A Framework and Methodology for Business and Technology Improvement 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC St. Lucie Press Boca Raton London New York Washington, D.C. TOTALLY INTEGRATED ENTERPRISES A Framework and Methodology for Business and Technology Improvement Thomas E. Miller • Daryle W. Berger Raytheon Professional Services, LLC 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC This book contains information obtained from authentic and highly regarded sources. Reprinted material is quoted with permission, and sources are indicated. A wide variety of references are listed. Reasonable efforts have been made to publish reliable data and information, but the author and the publisher cannot assume responsibility for the validity of all materials or for the consequences of their use. Neither this book nor any part may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, microfilming, and recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. The consent of CRC Press LLC does not extend to copying for general distribution, for promotion, for creating new works, or for resale. Specific permission must be obtained in writing from CRC Press LLC for such copying. Direct all inquiries to CRC Press LLC, 2000 N.W. Corporate Blvd., Boca Raton, Florida 33431. Trademark Notice: Product or corporate names may be trademarks or registered trademarks, and are used only for identification and explanation, without intent to infringe. Visit the CRC Press Web site at www.crcpress.com 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC St. Lucie Press is an imprint of CRC Press LLC No claim to original U.S. Government works International Standard Book Number 1-57444-303-8 Library of Congress Card Number 2001019413 Printed in the United States of America 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Printed on acid-free paper Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Miller, Thomas E. Totally integrated enterprise : a framework and methodology for business and technology improvement / Thomas E. Miller, Daryle W. Berger, Raytheon Professional Services LLC. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 1-57444-303-8 (alk. paper) 1. Electronic commerce. 2. Management information systems. 3. Information technology. I. Berger, Daryle W. II. Raytheon Professional Services LLC. III. Title. HF5548.32 .M55 2001 658′.05--dc21 2001019413 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC v Dedication To my father who portrays the true pioneer spirit and of whom I am very proud and in loving memory of my mother. Also to Judy, my loving wife and life-long partner who has always stood with me. TEM To Melvin and Jerry Berger, my parents, who taught me there are at least two sides to every story and some truth in every side. And to Patricia, my wonderful wife, who often reminds me to not sweat the small stuff — but seldom tells me what the small stuff is. DWB 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC vi Testimonials Raytheon Professional Services is dedicated to helping its clients make substantial and lasting improvements in their operational and financial performance. Tom and Daryle’s book, Totally Integrated Enterprises, explains what the enterprise of the future looks like and what it takes to get there. It sets the tone for the kinds of change that RPS enables and it creates a vision of what our customers will want to be. Roger Blomgren, Vice President and General Manager, Raytheon Professional Services The authors have packaged a complex set of ideas into an easy to under- stand business model. My experience with Tom Miller and the Raytheon Professional Services staff will change forever the way I approach business. This book will change the way you approach your business. Chris Church, Program Manager, Compaq Computer Corporation Having worked with Tom Miller and the Raytheon Professional Services staff, I fully endorse this unique insight on enterprise architectures that provides the framework to create value for optimizing the utilization of technology at all levels. This is certainly on the cutting-edge. Barham Moss, IT Services, SBC Communications 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC vii Preface Most enterprises, today, are in the process of reengineering themselves. Often, as a result of acquisitions and mergers, a legacy of varied cultures, resources, and processes must be reshaped into a single, integrated enterprise. Additionally, increasing pressure from global competition for narrowing markets is forcing each company to make itself a cost-effective, high-quality provider to its traditional customers while simultaneously pushing it to deploy more of its talents and strengths into new markets and product lines. At the foundations of today’s leading-edge companies is a remarkably similar vision for virtual enterprise in an agile environment where orga- nizations can swiftly and cost-effectively move products from concept to production and respond dynamically to changes in customer and market requirements. Attributes of such agile enterprises include the ability to: Incorporate business strategies and functions to drive product design and manufacturing requirements, operations, and post-pro- duction activities of product distribution and support Rapidly integrate designers, manufacturers, and suppliers to operate as a virtual enterprise — a unified entity unconstrained by geo- graphic distribution Create, staff, and empower integrated product teams, providing expertise from all shareholders, allowing timely decisions and feedback and resulting in higher-quality products in less time Communicate enterprise information (e.g., requirements, plans, designs, models, metrics, results, and other vital data) to and from every stakeholder in the virtual enterprise in real or near-real time Dynamically manage production among facilities and exchange pro- duction data and status information as a routine basis of business 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC viii Totally Integrated Enterprises Today it is recognized that the above vision and the attributes and best practices of a totally integrated enterprise are not peculiar, or exclusive, to one company. Nearly every enterprise in existence today needs to make a similar transition to a globally interdependent business paradigm. A staggering amount of literature is available for every aspect of modern business and enterprise. Courses, classes, seminars, and experts galore are available to help you learn and implement the fine details of every value-adding, cost-saving, customer -pleasing, quality-improving, buzzword-compliant business initiative you have ever heard of, and many that you haven’t. And therein lies the rub — there is so much material, so many nuances and fine points, and so many well-qualified experts on individual topics that it becomes very easy to become overwhelmed and disoriented by it all. Studying the details of each tree doesn’t really help much to navigate through the forest. What seem to be missing in the enterprise body of knowledge are generalist documents that tie things together. The business environment today is characterized by a rapid rate of business reconfiguration, short- ened periods of relevancy for expertise, higher personnel turnover, increased functional interdependency, and the pressure to include advanced technology in every aspect of business. It should not come as a surprise that more managers and leaders are being put into pivotal decision-making roles with less experience and preparation than ever before. Depth of understanding in one’s technical field is clearly a strength, but a narrow focus potentially creates blind spots for lack of understanding the bigger, integrated business picture. This book is proposed as something of a “Rosetta Stone” for dealing with enterprises, both existing and ideal ones. It provides, in simplified terms, key definitions, a comprehensive framework, and a methodology for understanding and mapping current enterprise configurations and for designing a revised architecture needed for totally integrated enterprise. This book provides a high-level enterprise architecture that allows for the implementation of processes that facilitate the use of the best com- mercial practices and technologies, both existing and emergent, to improve product and process integration. It also provides a technically sound basis for the timely development and delivery of robust products, including their life-cycle support and management, within a virtual enterprise. This material, when combined with a specific enterprise mission and examples, will help form a powerful vision that creates the pull for change within an organization and presents the opportunity for change. For seasoned managers and business leaders, this material should be something of a refresher course that helps get back to basics and helps confirm basic organizational values and direction. For the newly appointed 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC ix manager, or business student, this book should serve as a primer. Under- standing how it all fits together is a valuable insight for anyone involved in business today. 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC xi Acknowledgments Many individuals have helped to shape the content and flavor of the information contained in these chapters. The authors would like to thank Levoy Hurley, Farley Palmer, and Brian Smith for their collaboration and contributions to this work. Thanks also to Tom Austin for sharing his 30-plus years of experience and providing valuable feedback and for convincing us we had enough material to launch this book. Much appreciation goes to our clients who have provided and will continue to provide us the opportunity to work with them and expand our understandings of their problems. Without problems there wouldn’t be any appreciation for the solutions. TEM and DWB 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC xiii About the Authors Thomas E. Miller’s current position is with Raytheon as a master con- sultant providing leadership and technical consulting with emphasis on commercial enterprise architecture analysis and processes. He has tech- nical responsibilities for the enterprise architecture product area and continues to create and evaluate new methodologies and processes for the competitive enterprise. Mr. Miller has held key positions as program manager and senior scientist with Hughes Aircraft Company and as a senior scientist and senior principal with Raytheon. Prior to this Mr. Miller held positions in systems engineering and product design with Hughes Aircraft Company. Mr. Miller has successfully led, managed, and directed projects with technical and business responsibilities. He has assembled and directed technical and management teams from the interview/selection process through to the fulfillment of the project goals. He has also performed systems engineering management directing specifications development, requirements allocation, and design and managed system design, engi- neering, manufacturing and testing. He has also provided enterprise level information management/technology (IM/IT) strategic planning, develop- ment and implementation consulting for the integration of business, engi- neering, and manufacturing information for a major automotive manufacturer. He is a former advisor for the Saudi Air Defense Command. Mr. Miller’s professional affiliations include the Data Warehousing Insti- tute, the HTML Writers Guild, and the International Webmasters Associa- tion. He has been published in the Michigan Manufacturers Association’s Enterprise magazine and has provided numerous presentations to the National Research Council on enterprise architectures. 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC xiv Totally Integrated Enterprises Daryle W. Berger is a senior consultant for Raytheon Professional Ser- vices. He is responsible for internal product and client development, architecture and process development, and implementation planning to assist clients in achieving best-practice capabilities for competitive advan- tage in the global entrepreneurial arena. He designed and implemented a global engineering notebook for an international automotive program team. He adapted MIL-STD 490A into a corporate template for specifying automotive vehicle requirements and facilitated the development and adoption of a set of vehicle integration areas for use by the North American operations of a major automotive manufacturer. He also designed, developed, and delivered several rela- tional databases to support requirements engineering processes. Mr. Berger led the in-country software installation team for the Malay- sian Air Defense Ground Environment. In less than six months, a team of nine software developers installed, debugged, tested, and delivered over 1.4 million lines of operational software, including application, oper- ating system, diagnostic, and support functions. Prior to joining Raytheon, Mr. Berger was a senior systems engineer in the Ground Systems Group of Hughes Aircraft Company. In his career at Hughes, Mr. Berger provided technical, quality, and management leadership for the development and deployment of mission-critical, real- time embedded software on numerous air defense ground environment programs. Mr. Berger holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science (University of North Dakota). He also holds a bachelor’s degree in education (Moor- head State University) and did graduate studies in school administration. His professional affiliations include the Society of Automotive Engineers and the Engineering Society of Detroit. Mr. Berger has been published in the Michigan Manufacturers Association’s Enterprise magazine. In addition, Mr. Berger is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Eta Sigma scholastic honor societies. 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC xv List of Figures Figure 1.1 Architecture Taxonomy. ................................................ 5 Figure 2.1 Current Enterprise Environment.................................. 11 Figure 2.2 Totally Integrated Enterprise Attributes. ..................... 13 Figure 2.3 Totally Integrated Enterprise (Extended). ................... 17 Figure 2.4 Process-Oriented Component...................................... 20 Figure 2.5 Component-Based Enterprise. ..................................... 23 Figure 2.6 Value-Based Enterprise Architecture. .......................... 26 Figure 2.7 Component-Based Architecture Example. .................. 28 Figure 2.8 Multicompany Virtual Enterprise. ................................ 29 Figure 2.9 IPT Key Characteristics................................................ 31 Figure 4.1 Extended Enterprise Chain. ......................................... 45 Figure 4.2 Generic Enterprise Strategy Model. ............................ 47 Figure 4.3 Raytheon Model for Enterprise Alignment. ................ 48 Figure 4.4 Integrated Enterprise Framework................................ 49 Figure 4.5 Enterprise Views. ......................................................... 51 Figure 4.6 Business View of Enterprise. ...................................... 53 Figure 4.7 Process View of Enterprise. ........................................ 56 Figure 4.8 Resources View of Enterprise. .................................... 59 Figure 4.9 Enterprise Architecture Progression. ........................... 61 Figure 4.10 Perspective on Importance.......................................... 64 Figure 5.1 Enterprise Architecture Elements. ............................... 67 Figure 5.2 Aspects of Enterprise Architecture.............................. 68 Figure 5.3 Enterprise Process Framework. ................................... 70 Figure 5.4 Integrated Enterprise Example. ................................... 71 Figure 5.5 Executive Leadership Model. ...................................... 72 Figure 5.6 Enterprise Business Development............................... 75 Figure 5.7 Key Business Development Activities. ........................ 76 Figure 5.8 (Integrated) Product Management. ............................. 79 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC xvi Totally Integrated Enterprises Figure 5.9 Enterprise Process Framework. ................................... 81 Figure 5.10 IPPD in the Process Framework. ................................ 82 Figure 5.11 Product Program Life Cycle. ....................................... 84 Figure 5.12 Enterprise Process Framework. ................................... 86 Figure 5.13 Information Resources Management. .......................... 98 Figure 5.14 Multicompany Virtual Enterprise................................. 99 Figure 5.15 Environmental Policy Management Issues................ 105 Figure 5.16 External Relationships Management. ........................ 106 Figure 5.17 Continuous Improvement Techniques. ..................... 112 Figure 5.18 Process and Metric Maturity. ..................................... 113 Figure 6.1 Enterprise Modeling in Improvement Implementation. ......................................................... 117 Figure 6.2 Influence Diagram for Integrated Product Management. ................................................ 124 Figure 6.3 Influence Diagram for Robust Enterprise Components. ............................................ 127 Figure 6.4 Influence Diagram for a Learning Organization. ..... 130 Figure 6.5 IT Innovation Trends................................................. 131 Figure D.1 Technology Selection and Evolution. ....................... 149 Figure F.1 Data Management View. ........................................... 163 Figure F.2 Distributed Data within the Enterprise. .................... 163 Figure F.3 N-Tiered Integrated Data Management. .................... 166 Figure F.4 Data Management Planning and Implementation. ... 167 Figure F.5 Data Exploitation Views. ........................................... 168 Figure F.6 Top-Level IT View of the Enterprise. ....................... 169 Figure F.7 Integrated Data View for Enterprise. ........................ 172 Figure G.1 Enterprise Assessment Process.................................. 179 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC xvii List of Tables Table 4.1 List of Enterprise Views .............................................. 52 Table G.1 Enterprise Assessment Structure Based on Process Framework ................................................................. 178 2001 by Raytheon Professional Services LLC xix Contents 1 Introduction ...................................................................................... 1 Who Should Read This Book 2 Definition and Scope of Enterprise Architecture 3 About This Book 6 2 Totally Integrated Enterprise ......................................................... 9 Totally Integrated Enterprise Goals 10 Agile Enterprise 16 Robust Components for Enterprise 18 Component-Based Enterprise 22 Value-Based Enterprise Architecture 25 Virtual Enterprise Capability 27 Integrated Product Teams (Empowered People) 29 Collaborative Enterprise 31 3 Introduction to Enterprise Architecture.................................... 35 Need for Enterprise Architecture 36 Nature of Enterprise Architecture 38 Integrated Enterprise Architecture 41 4 Methodology for Understanding Enterprises ........................... 43 Enterprise Definition 44 Framework for Integrated Enterprise 46 Enterprise Views 50 Business View of Enterprise 53 Process View of Enterprise 55 Resources View of Enterprise 57 Architectural Progression 59 Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework 63 5 Best-Practice Enterprise Architecture............................

该用户的其他资料

  • 名称/格式
  • 评分
  • 下载次数
  • 资料大小
  • 上传时间

用户评论

0/200
    暂无评论
上传我的资料

相关资料

资料评价:

/ 16
所需积分:2 立即下载
返回
顶部
举报
资料
关闭

温馨提示

感谢您对爱问共享资料的支持,精彩活动将尽快为您呈现,敬请期待!